Tag Archives: Hutchinson River Restoration Project

10th Annual Thomas Pell Sanctuary Clean Up

 

Students from SUNY Purchase at our 2018 Clean Up

The Hutchinson River Restoration project will be holding its 10th Annual Clean Up of the Thomas Pell Wildlife Sanctuary in Pelham Bay Park on Sunday, Sept. 15, 2018 from 9 AM — 3 PM.

The Thomas Pell Wildlife Sanctuary is the largest salt marsh ecosystem in the Bronx and the second largest in NYC (the salt marsh in Jamaica Bay Park in Queens is the largest).

This annual event is a great way to:

  • learn about an important and crucial ecosystem right in our own backyard,
  • gather with friends and neighbors to support our community,
  • do your part in protecting the environment,
  • feel a sense of accomplishment and pride,
  • and have some good, clean(up) fun

Volunteers will assemble on the southwest corner of City Island Rd. and Shore Rd., Bronx, NY (across from the Pelham Bit Stables). The BX29 bus stops right there. Gloves, waterproof shoe coverings, and light refreshments will be provided.

Parking will be available in the Turtle Cove Driving Range parking area on City Island Rd.
For more information, call 718.885.9653
“Like” us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/HutchinsonRRP
Follow us on Twitter: @Hutchinsonriver
Hashtag: #RestoreTheHutch
This project is supported by American Rivers, the American Littoral Society, and the Urban Park Rangers.

About Salt Marshes and the Thomas Pell Sanctuary*:

“Salt marshes play a critical role in the support of human life, acting as natural filtration systems by trapping pollutants that would otherwise contaminate our bays and oceans. Salt marshes have the ability to absorb fertilizers, improve water quality, and reduce erosion. They are also among the richest wildlife habitats.”

“The Thomas Pell Wildlife Sanctuary and the Hunter Island Marine Zoology and Geology Sanctuary in the northeast Bronx consist of a total of 489 acres of marshes and forests within Pelham Bay Park. The City began landfill operations near this area on Tallapoosa Point in Pelham Bay Park in 1963. Plans to expand the landfills in Pelham Bay Park in 1966, which would have created the City’s second-largest refuse disposal site next to Fresh Kills in Staten Island, were met with widespread community opposition led by Councilmember Mario Merola, later Bronx District Attorney. This struggle resulted in the creation of the sanctuaries by a local law, signed by Mayor John V. Lindsay on October 11, 1967.”

“The Thomas Pell Wildlife Sanctuary makes up the westerly part of Pelham Bay Park (2,764 acres). Included within its bounds are Goose Creek Marsh and the saltwater wetlands adjoining the Hutchinson River as well as Goose Island, Split Rock, and the oak-hickory forests bordering the Split Rock Golf Course. The area is home to a variety of wildlife including raccoon, egrets, hawks, and the occasional ibis or coyote. The Sanctuary is named for Thomas Pell, the first European to control the land. Pell signed a treaty with the Siwanoy, the Native American tribe that previously occupied this area, in 1654, marking the first time a Briton owned significant property near Dutch New Amsterdam.”

*courtesy of the NYC Parks Dept.

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Life and death on the Hutch

A dolphin was found dead in the waters of the Hutch on Friday. The body was seen floating near Glover Park in a section of the river between Pelham and Mt. Vernon that is heavily industrialized and polluted.

The issue of raw sewage draining into the Hutch by the six municipalities along the river was just discussed at last Monday’s HRRP monthly meeting.

The dolphin’s body was removed by County Police and turned over to the DEC for a necropsy on Saturday. The results haven’t been released yet.

This tragedy serves to underscore the reasons for the formation of HRRP. The Hutch is considered to be the most polluted river in New York State. The efforts of HRRP are helping to make a difference but without cooperation — and funding — from the local municipalities, elected officials, and governmental agencies, our work is considerably more challenging.

The Hutch runs through the Thomas Pell Wildlife Sanctuary, part of the last remaining salt marsh ecosystem in the Bronx.

We urge you to consider subscribing to our HRRP Google Group email list so that you can keep informed and help in our efforts: https://groups.google.com/d/forum/hutchinson-river

You can also Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HutchinsonRRP/ and Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/hutchinsonriver

Our next Hutch Cleanup will take place in September, TBD. You can join us on Saturday, May 6th from 2-4pm for our annual Jane’s Walk to the top of the Pelham landfill for a spectacular view of the Hutch and surroundings.

Other articles and videos:


[HRRP President, Eleanor Rae, was interviewed in this video from Fios 1 News]

Click here to view video

Cleaning Up ‘The Hutch’

[Here’s the article by George Goss for which members of HRRP recently sat for an  interview. It appears in the latest edition  of Science and the City, published by NY City News Service.]

Cleaning Up ‘The Hutch’

STREAMLINED: The Hutchinson River, as seen from Pascap Scrapyard. Photo Credit: George Goss
STREAMLINED: The Hutchinson River, as seen from Pascap Scrapyard. Photo Credit: George Goss

BRONX – Part of the Hutchinson River near Mount Vernon recently earned the distinction of being the most fecal-contaminated of 52 sites of waterway tested in the Long Island Sound watershed by Save the Sound. The Hutchinson River Restoration Project, an environmental group advocating for a cleaner river, said that public access for kayakers and canoeists is necessary to end the pollution.

“Basically, we are interested in and hoping that someday ‘the Hutch’ will be something that people can use. You know, right now it is not accessible,” said Eleanor Rae, president of the Hutchinson River Restoration Project. “Public access is key.” Continue reading