Tag Archives: The Hutch

Cleanup Follow up

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We hope you all had an exciting, enjoyable and worthwhile day at our 7th Annual Hutch Cleanup. We’ll be submitting reports to the American Littoral Society and the Ocean Conservancy which sponsor and monitor these cleanups. The reports will be uploaded to the Documents section of the website for you to review.

We’d also like this year’s participants to report back to us as well. We’ve created a form on the website where you can give us your feedback about the event, for example, what site  you went to; the strangest / most unexpected thing you found; what you learned; suggestions and ideas for improving the event; or any other comments you want to make.

Go to our  “2016 Cleanup Participant Survey” page to fill out and submit the form. (your personal information will not be seen on the site). Or you may comment in the “Leave a Reply” box  at the bottom of the page.

Our thanks to everyone who helped out today. You are making a difference. Hope to see you at next year’s cleanup.

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Cleaning Up ‘The Hutch’

[Here’s the article by George Goss for which members of HRRP recently sat for an  interview. It appears in the latest edition  of Science and the City, published by NY City News Service.]

Cleaning Up ‘The Hutch’

STREAMLINED: The Hutchinson River, as seen from Pascap Scrapyard. Photo Credit: George Goss
STREAMLINED: The Hutchinson River, as seen from Pascap Scrapyard. Photo Credit: George Goss

BRONX – Part of the Hutchinson River near Mount Vernon recently earned the distinction of being the most fecal-contaminated of 52 sites of waterway tested in the Long Island Sound watershed by Save the Sound. The Hutchinson River Restoration Project, an environmental group advocating for a cleaner river, said that public access for kayakers and canoeists is necessary to end the pollution.

“Basically, we are interested in and hoping that someday ‘the Hutch’ will be something that people can use. You know, right now it is not accessible,” said Eleanor Rae, president of the Hutchinson River Restoration Project. “Public access is key.” Continue reading